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An Exploration of Branding, Design and Cultural Trends

More About Brooklyn Heights

This article in DealBreaker-referencing Brownstoner, answers my questions about Brooklyn Heights and the types of people that live there.

http://www.dealbreaker.com/2007/12/defend_brooklyn_goldman_sachs.php#more

"Defend Brooklyn: Goldman Sachs Invades Brooklyn Heights
The Brooklyn bloggers are up in arms after news leaked out on The Brownstoner, a popular blog about Brooklyn real estate, that a Goldman Sachs executive had purchased a brownstone on Joralemon Street in Brooklyn Heights. The Brownstoner went on to report that a broker had said that several Goldman Sachs bankers were looking in the neighborhood and that he knew of two other Goldmanite purchases in the area. We noticed the report this morning when it was picked up by Bloomberg.

Brooklyn Heights has long been popular with those who work in lower Manhattan. Access to several subway lines and the proximity to the Brooklyn Bridge make the commute to Manhattan quick and easy. Former Wall Street Journal editorial page editor long kept a house in Brooklyn Heights. Due to the work of preservationist icon and famed litigator Otis Pearsall,* much of the historic character of the neighborhood known as “America’s first suburb” has been retained. And it’s started to undergo something of a foodie renaissance, with restaurants like Noodle Pudding and Jack the Horse Tavern attracting crowds. CNBC’s Erin Burnett has said that her favorite restaurant in New York is Henry’s End, which sits on Henry Street in the Heights.

But a neighborhood revival is one thing. Three Goldman Sachs bankers moving in is another. The commenters on the blog ranged from those who adopted the pose of old money outraged that brash bankers might undo the genteel nature of their neighborhood to Park Slope socialists worried that yet another people’s republic—seriously, have you people ever been to the Food Co-op there?—might fall to the forces of capitalism next. And, of course, there were more than a few hipster types worried that their borough was losing it’s “special” status.

“Gentrified Brooklyn has gone from this alternative, creative-vibed place into a second-rate bourgeois social/money-climbing environment. Kiss Brooklyn's 'specialness' goodbye. It's worse than what it was alternative too,” one wrote.

All we can say is that it’s a good thing these people don’t know that one third of the permanent DealBreaker staff moved to Brooklyn Heights last March. They’d probably be marching in the streets."